Sherlock Holmes and the Mystery of Einstein’s Daughter

Sherlock Holmes and the Mystery of Einstein’s Daughter

£10.00

Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson travel to Switzerland and Serbia to investigate the true life mystery story of the disappearance of Nobel Prize Physicist Albert Einstein’s Daughter.

Where to buy

Sherlock Holmes and The Mystery of Einstein’s Daughter is available from all good bookstores including Amazon USA, Amazon UK, Waterstones UK, and for free shipping worldwide Book Depository. In ebook format it is in Amazon Kindle, Kobo, Nook and Apple iBooks (iPad/iPhone).

 

If you would like a signed copy from Tim Symonds, please use the button below.

Category:
Author: Tim Symonds
Product ID: 1113

Description

This book is for anyone who likes a celebrity scandal mystery. Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson travel to Switzerland and Serbia to investigate the true life mystery story of the disappearance of Nobel Prize Physicist Albert Einstein’s Daughter. Einstein’s wife Mileva Maric was a brilliant Serbian mathematician. This fiction story is based on the true mystery of why their daughter disappeared. The author whisks the reader off into the mysterious Balkans to follow the trail of clues about what really happened to their daughter. The book is classic Holmes, written in the style of Conan Doyle.

‘The name Albert Einstein is known the world over, much like Sherlock Holmes…I must heartily congratulate the author Tim Symonds on his writing. Reading ‘Sherlock Holmes And The Mystery of Einstein’s Daughter’ was not only presenting a fine mystery but a learning experience and a fine show-case into the situation of turn-of-the-Century Europe”

Nick Cardillo

‘The Mystery Of Einstein’s Daughter’ is the finest historical mystery novel I’ve read since Peter Ackroyd’s seminal ‘Hawksmoor’ which is itself easily one of the greatest works of British literature since the 1980s. Very few writers of fiction attend to historical detail with such care.”

Mike Walker

You can also buy Sherlock Holmes and The Mystery of Einstein’s Daughter (Paperback) from WaterStones Uk.

 

7 reviews for Sherlock Holmes and the Mystery of Einstein’s Daughter

  1. Journalist Mike Walker

    It’s the finest historical mystery novel I’ve read since reading Peter Ackroyd’s seminal Hawksmoor, which is itself easily one of the greatest works of British literature of the 1980s. Tim Symonds’ take on Sherlock Holmes is a fine one, and one of very few worthy of Conan Doyle’s characters found in contemporary post-canonical writing concerning Holmes and Watson. Highly recommended….
    As to the plot, the combination of Sherlock Holmes and Einstein at first struck me as a bit reaching, but it really works. Einstein obviously was one of the greatest thinkers and greatest men of the entire century and Holmes has been by tradition written a character on rare par in intellect with the great physicist.’ …’ While the novel is of course fiction, the supporting details when sourced from history are fully accurate and the reader will learn many fascinating things about England, Serbia, and the general state of life at the time just by reading this very engrossing mystery. This factor, for me as a journalist who has written about history and was educated at university in history, is quite spectacular.

  2. Nick Cardillo – ‘an expert on Sherlock Holmes

    The name Albert Einstein is known the world over, much like Sherlock Holmes…. I must heartily congratulate author Tim Symonds on his writing… Symonds’ research into his subjects was terrific, weaving in Sherlockian and historical knowledge into the plot. Reading The Mystery of Einstein’s Daughter was not only presenting a fine mystery, but a learning experience,and a fine showcase into the situation of turn-of-the-century Europe.

  3. Frederic Golden

    A wonderful, page-flipping read. You’ve caught the Conan Doyle ambience and cadences beautifully. At times, I was sure I was back again in the old master of Baker Street’s literary hands. Hooray to you for bringing back the great Sherlock and his faithful sidekick Watson. And, not incidentally, for taking me back to those exciting, youthful Saturday afternoons in the movie house watching Messrs Rathbone and Bruce, Hollywood’s best Holmes and Watson, at work. For this old geezer, that was an anti-aging pill, for sure. Keep up the splendid work.

  4. Calvin Daniels

    Not a full four, dragging a bit off the start with a Moran subplot that seemed forced into the story just to add pages to an admittedly short book.

    But once the story hit the Einstein storyline a very good tale emerged.

  5. C.B. Calsing

    Tim Symonds’s Sherlock Holmes and the Mystery of Einstein’s Daughter, we are treated to a mystery wherein the great detective is asked to look into the past of the up-and-coming physicist, Albert Einstein.

    This is a book for nerds, both for Einstein nerds and Sherlock Holmes nerds. It is chock-full of inside references and history. Those already savvy in the lives of the historic and fictional characters involved will really get them, while others might feel a little lost. I am both an Einstein and a Holmes nerd, so I appreciated most of these references and allusions.

    This book is extensively well researched, as the end notes and acknowledgements show. The tone and characters fit right along with Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s canon, as well as those who have come between him and Tim Symonds. The author also gives us a deeper grounding into Watson’s point of view than Doyle would have, which probably appeals more to modern audiences. There are many lush geographical details and a nice touch of the macabre to boot.

    A couple of things sort of irked me about this story. The first is that the title case is not presented until about a third of the way through the story. That seemed a little late in coming. The other issue for me was the sheer number of times other cases were mentioned by their story title. To me that became a little distracting, even if it is a hallmark of the genre.

    This was a very satisfying summer read for this nerd, and I look forward to more adventures with Holmes and Watson from Mr. Symonds.

  6. Phi Beta Kappa Authors

    From the publisher: The Dean of a Swiss university persuades Sherlock Holmes to investigate the background of a would-be lecturer. To Dr. Watson it seems a very humdrum commission – but who is the mysterious ‘Lieserl’? How does her existence threaten the ambitions of the technical assistant level III in Room 86 at the Federal Patents Office in Berne by the name of Albert Einstein? The assignment plunges Holmes and Watson into unfathomable Serbia to solve one of the intractable mysteries of the 20th Century. In Tim Symonds’ previous detective novels, Sherlock Holmes and the Dead Boer At Scotney Castle and Sherlock Holmes And The Case Of The Bulgarian Codex the author based pivotal historic facts and a principal character on real life. So too in this new mystery.

  7. Ines Tudert Kan

    Wow!! That was an amazing adventurous and informative book. A unique mystery for Mister Sherlock Holmes and his camarade Dr Watson to solve, and as the Professor said “Mr Holmes, young Einstein’s fate lies entirely in your hands

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